This Page

has moved to a new address:

http://www.burnthismamadown.com

Sorry for the inconvenienceā€¦

Redirection provided by Blogger to WordPress Migration Service
<data:blog.pageTitle/>

This Page

has moved to a new address:

http://www.burnthismamadown.com

Sorry for the inconvenienceā€¦

Redirection provided by Blogger to WordPress Migration Service
----------------------------------------------- Blogger Template Style Name: Minima Designer: Douglas Bowman URL: www.stopdesign.com Date: 26 Feb 2004 ----------------------------------------------- */ body { background:#fff; margin:0; padding:40px 20px; font:x-small Georgia,Serif; text-align:center; color:#333; font-size/* */:/**/small; font-size: /**/small; } a:link { color:#58a; text-decoration:none; } a:visited { color:#969; text-decoration:none; } a:hover { color:#c60; text-decoration:underline; } a img { border-width:0; } /* Header ----------------------------------------------- */ @media all { #header { width:660px; margin:0 auto 10px; border:1px solid #ccc; } } @media handheld { #header { width:90%; } } #blog-title { margin:5px 5px 0; padding:20px 20px .25em; border:1px solid #eee; border-width:1px 1px 0; font-size:200%; line-height:1.2em; font-weight:normal; color:#666; text-transform:uppercase; letter-spacing:.2em; } #blog-title a { color:#666; text-decoration:none; } #blog-title a:hover { color:#c60; } #description { margin:0 5px 5px; padding:0 20px 20px; border:1px solid #eee; border-width:0 1px 1px; max-width:700px; font:78%/1.4em "Trebuchet MS",Trebuchet,Arial,Verdana,Sans-serif; text-transform:uppercase; letter-spacing:.2em; color:#999; } /* Content ----------------------------------------------- */ @media all { #content { width:660px; margin:0 auto; padding:0; text-align:left; } #main { width:410px; float:left; } #sidebar { width:220px; float:right; } } @media handheld { #content { width:90%; } #main { width:100%; float:none; } #sidebar { width:100%; float:none; } } /* Headings ----------------------------------------------- */ h2 { margin:1.5em 0 .75em; font:78%/1.4em "Trebuchet MS",Trebuchet,Arial,Verdana,Sans-serif; text-transform:uppercase; letter-spacing:.2em; color:#999; } /* Posts ----------------------------------------------- */ @media all { .date-header { margin:1.5em 0 .5em; } .post { margin:.5em 0 1.5em; border-bottom:1px dotted #ccc; padding-bottom:1.5em; } } @media handheld { .date-header { padding:0 1.5em 0 1.5em; } .post { padding:0 1.5em 0 1.5em; } } .post-title { margin:.25em 0 0; padding:0 0 4px; font-size:140%; font-weight:normal; line-height:1.4em; color:#c60; } .post-title a, .post-title a:visited, .post-title strong { display:block; text-decoration:none; color:#c60; font-weight:normal; } .post-title strong, .post-title a:hover { color:#333; } .post div { margin:0 0 .75em; line-height:1.6em; } p.post-footer { margin:-.25em 0 0; color:#ccc; } .post-footer em, .comment-link { font:78%/1.4em "Trebuchet MS",Trebuchet,Arial,Verdana,Sans-serif; text-transform:uppercase; letter-spacing:.1em; } .post-footer em { font-style:normal; color:#999; margin-right:.6em; } .comment-link { margin-left:.6em; } .post img { padding:4px; border:1px solid #ddd; } .post blockquote { margin:1em 20px; } .post blockquote p { margin:.75em 0; } /* Comments ----------------------------------------------- */ #comments h4 { margin:1em 0; font:bold 78%/1.6em "Trebuchet MS",Trebuchet,Arial,Verdana,Sans-serif; text-transform:uppercase; letter-spacing:.2em; color:#999; } #comments h4 strong { font-size:130%; } #comments-block { margin:1em 0 1.5em; line-height:1.6em; } #comments-block dt { margin:.5em 0; } #comments-block dd { margin:.25em 0 0; } #comments-block dd.comment-timestamp { margin:-.25em 0 2em; font:78%/1.4em "Trebuchet MS",Trebuchet,Arial,Verdana,Sans-serif; text-transform:uppercase; letter-spacing:.1em; } #comments-block dd p { margin:0 0 .75em; } .deleted-comment { font-style:italic; color:gray; } .paging-control-container { float: right; margin: 0px 6px 0px 0px; font-size: 80%; } .unneeded-paging-control { visibility: hidden; } /* Sidebar Content ----------------------------------------------- */ #sidebar ul { margin:0 0 1.5em; padding:0 0 1.5em; border-bottom:1px dotted #ccc; list-style:none; } #sidebar li { margin:0; padding:0 0 .25em 15px; text-indent:-15px; line-height:1.5em; } #sidebar p { color:#666; line-height:1.5em; } /* Profile ----------------------------------------------- */ #profile-container { margin:0 0 1.5em; border-bottom:1px dotted #ccc; padding-bottom:1.5em; } .profile-datablock { margin:.5em 0 .5em; } .profile-img { display:inline; } .profile-img img { float:left; padding:4px; border:1px solid #ddd; margin:0 8px 3px 0; } .profile-data { margin:0; font:bold 78%/1.6em "Trebuchet MS",Trebuchet,Arial,Verdana,Sans-serif; text-transform:uppercase; letter-spacing:.1em; } .profile-data strong { display:none; } .profile-textblock { margin:0 0 .5em; } .profile-link { margin:0; font:78%/1.4em "Trebuchet MS",Trebuchet,Arial,Verdana,Sans-serif; text-transform:uppercase; letter-spacing:.1em; } /* Footer ----------------------------------------------- */ #footer { width:660px; clear:both; margin:0 auto; } #footer hr { display:none; } #footer p { margin:0; padding-top:15px; font:78%/1.6em "Trebuchet MS",Trebuchet,Verdana,Sans-serif; text-transform:uppercase; letter-spacing:.1em; } /* Feeds ----------------------------------------------- */ #blogfeeds { } #postfeeds { }

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Fiddlehead Ferns

I have definitely heard of fiddlehead ferns and seen them at restaurants but I had never actually had one before. Or, if I did, they were mixed in with some creamy sauce that didn't let me experience their true flavor. When I saw them at the farmers' market this past weekend I jumped on the chance to try them.

I had to do a little googling to learn more about them and how they should be prepared. I learned that they grow wild in wet areas of North East America, particularly in New England, and are only available for three weeks in May. They are a good source of Omega 3 and 6, iron, fiber and potassium. When cooking, treat them as you would asparagus as they have similar flavor and texture. Most people recommended blanching and then sauteing them.

The first time I cooked them, I just threw a bunch of  them in with a mix of veggies, with a bit of olive oil, salt and pepper, and grilled them in my grill basket. This worked really well and I really loved their flavor. The second time I decided to try the blanch/saute method which was equally as good. I am definitely going to enjoy these guys while I can each Spring.

Ingredients:
Bunch of fiddlehead ferns
Garlic clove(s) chopped, to taste
Olive oil
Kosher salt
Freshly ground pepper
Lemon juice and zest

Directions:
Wash and dry ferns, removing any brown silky parts that remain. Trim ends to 1/2 in of the furl.

Bring a pot of salted water to a rolling boil. Prepare an ice bath in a bowl. Add ferns to boiling water and cook for 1 minute. Remove from heat and drain ferns. Dump drained ferns into ice bath. Remove ferns and pat dry.

Heat oil in saute pan. Add garlic and cook 1 minute. Add ferns and saute until edges are slightly brown and ferns are tender but still crunchy, about 10 minutes. Top with Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper, a couple squeezes of lemon juice and some lemon zest. Serve immediately.

 

Linked to Little Brick Ranch Foodie Friday and Real Sustenance Seasonal Sunday.

Labels:

4 Comments:

Blogger The Corner Girl said...

Looks so yummy! I've heard you can only eat them safely if they are still curled up like that. My parents had some asparagus pop up from last year's batch, it was so yummy!
I also went morel mushroom hunting with my good friend and we got a full pound and a half!! lol I cooked them all up and we ate every last one. I got sick off of them! lol :P

May 25, 2011 at 5:19 PM  
Blogger Christina said...

@The Corner Girl I would love to go mushroom hunting, that sounds fun! I need to see if I can find some morels at the farmers market. I also want to try ramps.

May 26, 2011 at 9:26 AM  
Blogger Kitchen Belleicious said...

your the second person I have seen do these and i am so interested but I can't find them anywhere. So jealous too because they look amazing

May 27, 2011 at 9:00 AM  
Blogger Little Brick Ranch said...

I love these!! I saw them at the market the other day but had no idea what I would do with them!! Stop by tomorrow for Foodie Friday...these will be featured!!

June 2, 2011 at 11:10 AM  

Post a Comment

I love comments! Thanks for taking the time to leave me one! If you have a specific question, please make sure that your email is linked to your account so that I can respond to you directly.

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home

C + C Marriage Factory: Fiddlehead Ferns

Fiddlehead Ferns

I have definitely heard of fiddlehead ferns and seen them at restaurants but I had never actually had one before. Or, if I did, they were mixed in with some creamy sauce that didn't let me experience their true flavor. When I saw them at the farmers' market this past weekend I jumped on the chance to try them.

I had to do a little googling to learn more about them and how they should be prepared. I learned that they grow wild in wet areas of North East America, particularly in New England, and are only available for three weeks in May. They are a good source of Omega 3 and 6, iron, fiber and potassium. When cooking, treat them as you would asparagus as they have similar flavor and texture. Most people recommended blanching and then sauteing them.

The first time I cooked them, I just threw a bunch of  them in with a mix of veggies, with a bit of olive oil, salt and pepper, and grilled them in my grill basket. This worked really well and I really loved their flavor. The second time I decided to try the blanch/saute method which was equally as good. I am definitely going to enjoy these guys while I can each Spring.

Ingredients:
Bunch of fiddlehead ferns
Garlic clove(s) chopped, to taste
Olive oil
Kosher salt
Freshly ground pepper
Lemon juice and zest

Directions:
Wash and dry ferns, removing any brown silky parts that remain. Trim ends to 1/2 in of the furl.

Bring a pot of salted water to a rolling boil. Prepare an ice bath in a bowl. Add ferns to boiling water and cook for 1 minute. Remove from heat and drain ferns. Dump drained ferns into ice bath. Remove ferns and pat dry.

Heat oil in saute pan. Add garlic and cook 1 minute. Add ferns and saute until edges are slightly brown and ferns are tender but still crunchy, about 10 minutes. Top with Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper, a couple squeezes of lemon juice and some lemon zest. Serve immediately.

 

Linked to Little Brick Ranch Foodie Friday and Real Sustenance Seasonal Sunday.

Labels: