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Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Pickled Peppers

This year we planted three pepper plants: Hungarian hot, banana, and Serrano. As a result we have more peppers than we know what to do with! I found a pickled pepper recipe from David Lebovitz that sounded like a doable alternative to canning. I have never canned before, but I'm thinking that the way these peppers are growing I may need to start.

Does anyone have any good ideas for what to do with an abundance of peppers? Or any good canning resources? Please share in the comments if you do and post any links to good pepper recipes!


Ingredients:
1 pound fresh jalapeno (or other) peppers, washed
2 1/2 cups water
2 1/2 cups vinegar (I used white distilled vinegar)
3 tablespoons sugar
3 tablespoons coarse salt, such as kosher
2 bay leaves
2 tablespoons whole coriander seeds
3 cloves garlic, peeled
2 tablespoons black peppercorns


Directions:
Stab each pepper three times with a sharp paring knife and place them in a large glass preserving jar.



In a non-reactive saucepan, bring the other ingredients to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for five minutes.


Remove from heat and pour the brine over the peppers. Place the lid on the jar and let cool. Once cool, refrigerate for at least a week before using, if possible.


Serve whole, with Mexican dishes, or remove the seeds then chop and use to season any recipe that is improved by a little bit of sweet heat.

Store in the refrigerator for up to a few weeks.

We tried these peppers after letting them sit for a week. The heat definitely died down some from the pickling. Before, I couldn't even take a tiny bite of one and after I could eat a whole one with only minor amounts of crying! They taste great sliced up and served with any dish that needs some heat.

Labels: ,

16 Comments:

Blogger anniebakes said...

My family Loves peppers, I'm gong to give this a try this weekend, thanks for the recipe and the idea!

anne
www.anniebakes.net

August 18, 2010 at 10:12 AM  
Anonymous mrs lusher of the lushers said...

Those look great! I love pickled peppers & would have loved to do this with ours this year, but some animal snapped all of our pepper plants in half :(

August 18, 2010 at 10:54 AM  
Blogger Kristin @ Peace, Love and Muesli said...

Are the serrano's long red ones? We grow those and they dry well. Jamie Oliver put them in the food processor with salt to make a hot salt. You could do the same with sugar I bet.
You could also make salsa or tomato sauce and freeze it.
The pickled sounds tasty, my husband and dad would be all over that!

August 18, 2010 at 11:06 AM  
Blogger Christina said...

@Kristin @ Peace, Love and MuesliThe Serranos are long, skinny, and green. Hot salt is definitely something we would be interested in, I will look that up!

I should definitely think about freezing some salsa, too. Thanks for the suggestions!

August 18, 2010 at 11:40 AM  
Anonymous Unplanned Cooking said...

I'm not sure I've ever had pickled peppers, which is odd... I do use peppers all the time in things like sauce, soups, etc.

August 18, 2010 at 2:37 PM  
Anonymous Jen said...

I am planning on doing this tonight! I have a big handful of jalapenos and some banana peppers and some cherry peppers and I found David's recipe too. I'm glad to see you tried it first and it was pretty easy.

August 18, 2010 at 3:34 PM  
Blogger Amanda @ Serenity Now said...

Those look amazing!!! Thanks for the visit today. :)

August 18, 2010 at 9:03 PM  
Blogger KiraAJ said...

i love chillies :) the hot ones i either hang and let dry or if im drying other herbs and spices ( usually do this often) in the dehydrator and store them in my jars for use over winter. I also love making up my own chilli paste (chillies onion garlic salt lil lime juice) and i add this to asian style dishes or if you like spice with bland dishes add ita lil bit to the side of ur plate if u enjoy spicey! Dip your fork into it and grab some grub instant spice to every bite! I also take the dryed ones and put them in my coffee grinder that i do not use for coffee and grind them up and make my own chilli powders as well which i then add to my own homemade taco seasoning mixes and steak rubs as well.

August 18, 2010 at 10:11 PM  
Blogger Pam said...

Great idea! My chili loving husband would really love these.

August 19, 2010 at 10:49 AM  
Blogger Baby Bregel-Bausum said...

hi love this blog! will be following! follow me if you like.

August 19, 2010 at 12:28 PM  
Blogger Adrienne said...

Canning is actually really easy! A great place to start is with the Ball Blue Book. It's a great book for beginners, and it's cheap! You could probably find it at your local grocery store near the canning supplies for about $6.

But be warned: it's addictive. Once you learn, you want to can EVERYTHING! :)

August 19, 2010 at 3:27 PM  
Blogger Christina said...

@Adrienne Thanks! I will definitely check that book out. I can totally see myself getting into canning and wanting to can everything!

August 19, 2010 at 4:39 PM  
Blogger Adrienne said...

@Christina
No problem! I just started this year, and I absolutely love it. I feel like I'm canning everything in sight!

And good luck with the vanilla! I have a picture of mine after 24 hours that I'll post later tonight that shows how dark it's getting already...and it actually smells like vanilla!

August 19, 2010 at 4:48 PM  
Anonymous Christine said...

These looks so beautiful! I'm really ready for summer to get back here.

January 19, 2011 at 11:22 AM  
Blogger Jack Burton said...

Keeping the peppers whole limits the amount you can put into each jar. We have a real abundance each year so we slice into rings and discard the seeds. It's amazing how many peppers you can squeeze into a jar if you are motivated. :-)

Our recipe is just white vinegar and kosher salt. That's it. Sometimes I might drop a sprig of fresh cilantro in if I am feeling creative. We don't boil or get fancy. Just slice and dump. I'd like to say the peppers keep for months in the fridge but we never allow them to stay there that long. We'll go through a gallon jar of Hungarians in a few weeks. The hotter peppers take a little longer but months.

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C + C Marriage Factory: Pickled Peppers

Pickled Peppers

This year we planted three pepper plants: Hungarian hot, banana, and Serrano. As a result we have more peppers than we know what to do with! I found a pickled pepper recipe from David Lebovitz that sounded like a doable alternative to canning. I have never canned before, but I'm thinking that the way these peppers are growing I may need to start.

Does anyone have any good ideas for what to do with an abundance of peppers? Or any good canning resources? Please share in the comments if you do and post any links to good pepper recipes!


Ingredients:
1 pound fresh jalapeno (or other) peppers, washed
2 1/2 cups water
2 1/2 cups vinegar (I used white distilled vinegar)
3 tablespoons sugar
3 tablespoons coarse salt, such as kosher
2 bay leaves
2 tablespoons whole coriander seeds
3 cloves garlic, peeled
2 tablespoons black peppercorns


Directions:
Stab each pepper three times with a sharp paring knife and place them in a large glass preserving jar.



In a non-reactive saucepan, bring the other ingredients to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for five minutes.


Remove from heat and pour the brine over the peppers. Place the lid on the jar and let cool. Once cool, refrigerate for at least a week before using, if possible.


Serve whole, with Mexican dishes, or remove the seeds then chop and use to season any recipe that is improved by a little bit of sweet heat.

Store in the refrigerator for up to a few weeks.

We tried these peppers after letting them sit for a week. The heat definitely died down some from the pickling. Before, I couldn't even take a tiny bite of one and after I could eat a whole one with only minor amounts of crying! They taste great sliced up and served with any dish that needs some heat.

Labels: ,